• Life Story of John Donne

    This is a video I made for my english glass where we were told to make a presentation to class about the poet John Donne. Hope you like it. This contains extracts from John Donne Biography Publisher A&E Television Networks http://www.biography.com/people/john-donne-9277090#profile

    published: 16 Sep 2015
  • MASSOLIT: John Donne's Love Poetry

    In this lecture, Dr Anna Beer (University of Oxford) thinks about Donne’s poetry about love, focusing in particular on the poems The Sun Rising, The Good Morrow and The Canonization.

    published: 29 Jan 2016
  • Meta Physical Poets : John Donne

    This Lecture is on John Donne who is Known for his Metaphysical Poetry.Here meaning of Metaphysical poetry is explained As well as vivid discussion on john donne poetry is made. Objectives : 1. To understand the concept of Metaphysical poetry. 2. To learn about poet John Donne.

    published: 10 Dec 2015
  • Simon Schama's John Donne

    published: 02 Dec 2016
  • 06 John Donne

    A quick sketch of John Donne's life up until his writing of the Holy Sonnets, to give you a sense of the contradictions at the heart of his character.

    published: 21 Nov 2015
  • Richard Burton reads John Donne's poem 'Go and catch a falling star'

    published: 16 Sep 2010
  • The Flea by John Donne

    Description

    published: 15 Jun 2015
  • No Man is an Island by John Donne | Ep #58

    Click to subscribe - - - - http://goo.gl/V0wpjW No Man Is An Island by John Donne (used as the epigraph in "For Whom the Bell Tolls" by Ernest Hemingway) No man is an island, Entire of itself, Every man is a piece of the continent, A part of the main. If a clod be washed away by the sea, Europe is the less. As well as if a promontory were. As well as if a manor of thy friend's Or of thine own were: Any man's death diminishes me, Because I am involved in mankind, And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; It tolls for thee.

    published: 02 Jul 2014
  • The Flea By John Donne Analysis

    Analysis of the metaphysical poet Donne's poem in relation to the theme of love

    published: 05 Apr 2017
  • The Flea by John Donne - Poetry Reading

    The Flea - A poem by John Donne. About the poem - 'The Flea' is a complex yet almost hilarious conversation between two lovers, where the young man uses his exceptionally persuasive skills to coax his lady love to sleep with him. Throughout the poem Donne uses a skilled combination of tone, suggestive words and double meaning, to present an argument which is so clever that it might actually lead to the speaker having his way. About the poet - John Donne (19 June 1572 -- 31 March 1631) was an English poet, satirist, lawyer. He is considered as the representative of the metaphysical poets. His works are noted for their strong, sensual style and include sonnets, love poetry, religious poems, Latin translations, epigrams, elegies, songs, satires and sermons. His poetry is noted for its vib...

    published: 04 Dec 2012
  • Wit - "Death, Be Not Proud"

    Vivian, a graduate student, discusses the meaning and punctuation of John Dunne's "Holy Sonnet X" with her professor, Dr. Ashford. The sonnet is often known by its first line, "Death, Be Not Proud." Visit my channel for more films that quote poetry.

    published: 28 Jun 2010
  • The Good Morrow- John Donne

    I wonder, by my troth, what thou and I Did, till we loved? Were we not weaned till then? But sucked on country pleasures, childishly? Or snorted we in the Seven Sleepers' den? 'Twas so; but this, all pleasures fancies be. If ever any beauty I did see, Which I desired, and got, 'twas but a dream of thee. And now good-morrow to our waking souls, Which watch not one another out of fear; For love, all love of other sights controls, And makes one little room an everywhere. Let sea-discoverers to new worlds have gone, Let maps to other, worlds on worlds have shown, Let us possess one world, each hath one, and is one. My face in thine eye, thine in mine appears, And true plain hearts do in the faces rest; Where can we find two better hemispheres, Without sharp north, without declining west? Wha...

    published: 15 Dec 2013
  • The Sun Rising by John Donne - Poetry Reading

    The Sun Rising - A poem by John Donne. About the poem - The Sun Rising is one of Donne's popular and widely read and enjoyed love poems. It is a love poem of an unusual kind. In this poem, composed in the form of a dramatic monologue, the poet lover reprimands the Sun and calls it names for disturbing love making. About the poet - John Donne (19 June 1572 -- 31 March 1631) was an English poet, satirist, lawyer. He is considered as the representative of the metaphysical poets. His works are noted for their strong, sensual style and include sonnets, love poetry, religious poems, Latin translations, epigrams, elegies, songs, satires and sermons. His poetry is noted for its vibrancy of language and inventiveness of metaphor, especially compared to that of his contemporaries. For more vid...

    published: 21 Nov 2012
  • John Donne - The Good-Morrow - Poetry Lecture and Analysis by Dr. Andrew Barker

    THE GOOD MORROW. A love poem from the morning after. Upon waking, the poet feels a new kind of love for the woman he is with. And this poem, "The Good Morrow", is what he tells her. But what was their relationship like? How has it changed? What will their love be like in the future? Dr. Andrew Barker's lecture on "The Good Morrow", looks at both the confidence and vulnerability of the one who speaks the beautiful lines that make up this declaration of heightened love. Note: Analysis of the line "Suckled on country pleasures childishly" contains profanity (34:40 -- 36:54). Andrew Barker Please LIKE and SUBSCRIBE. COMMENTS also are gratefully received. Click http://drandrewbarker.com should ...

    published: 07 Jun 2014
  • John Donne Biography

    Recorded with http://screencast-o-matic.com

    published: 24 Apr 2017
  • What is JOHN DONNE GO AND CATCH A FALLING STAREE? BA English Literature (social sciences) Gurukpo

    Dr. Meenakshi Thakur, Assistant Professor, Biyani girls College explained about The poem of Donne in which he challenges that no woman on this earth will be honest and beautiful at the same time. www.gurukpo.com, www.biyanicolleges.org

    published: 02 Sep 2015
  • A Brief Introduction Of John Donne by Munawar Ahmad Saeed

    A Brief Introduction Of John Donne by Munawar Ahmad Saeed http://englishhelplineforall.blogspot.com contactmunawar@gmail.com times college, times college samanabad, punjab university Lahore, punjab university course outline, punjab university MA english Notes, punjab university MA english lecture, ............................. punjab university ma english private admission 2017 last date, punjab university ma english part 1 date sheet 2017, punjab university ma english syllabus 2017, punjab university ma english part 1 result 2016, english literature notes, history of english literature, literary Terms english grammar and composition american literature history of english literature literature books Classic English Literature Reading List English Literature Dictionary audio lectures o...

    published: 20 Oct 2016
  • Part 2 - The 3 Lives of John Donne; Why Metaphysical

    This is the second part of my lecture on A Valediction Forbidding Mourning. I have made every effort to provide a deep insight into the poem while keeping the lecture as simple as possible. That is why no previous knowledge of poetry is necessary for a full understanding of it. I hope you find it useful. Part One - A Preview Part Two - The Three Lives of John Donne, The Mysterious Meaning of Metaphysical Part Three - An Introduction to the Poem, Stanza: 1 & 2 Part Four - Stanza: 3,4 & 5 Part Five - Stanza: 6,7,8,& 9; Comparative Considerations

    published: 20 Jan 2013
  • Poetry Analysis 22: “The Sun Rising” by John Donne

    Poetry Analysis 22: “The Sun Rising” by John Donne

    published: 28 Jan 2015
  • Death, Be Not Proud by John Donne - Poetry Reading

    Death, Be Not Proud - A poem by John Donne. About the poem - "Death Be Not Proud" is a poem by English metaphysical poet John Donne, written around 1610 and first published posthumously in 1633. It is the tenth sonnet of Donne's posthumously published Holy Sonnets. The poem is addressed to Death, telling him not to be proud, because death is not to be feared. The poem explains because sleep is a type of death, and that it is pleasurable, then death must be even more so; that death is a slave to fate, chance (accidental death), kings (who have the power of life and death, such as the ability to levy war and command executions), and desperate men. The theme of the poem is generally describing about mortality. The sonnet has an ABBA ABBA CDDC EE rhyming scheme, emblematic of an enclosed rhy...

    published: 26 Sep 2012
  • John Donne The Sun Rising

    The Sun Rising by John Donne John Donne (pron.: /ˈdʌn/ DUN) (between 24 January and 19 June 1572[1] -- 31 March 1631) was an English poet, satirist, lawyer and a cleric in the Church of England. He is considered the pre-eminent representative of the metaphysical poets. His works are noted for their strong, sensual style and include sonnets, love poetry, religious poems, Latin translations, epigrams, elegies, songs, satires and sermons. His poetry is noted for its vibrancy of language and inventiveness of metaphor, especially compared to that of his contemporaries. Donne's style is characterised by abrupt openings and various paradoxes, ironies and dislocations. These features, along with his frequent dramatic or everyday speech rhythms, his tense syntax and his tough eloquence, were both a...

    published: 09 Feb 2013
  • The Indifferent by John Donne (read by Tom O'Bedlam)

    This is a poem about jealousy and fidelity. Let me offer a theory: that jealousy is differently motivated in men and women: that male jealousy is inherently different from female jealousy. Jealousy is in our DNA because serves an evolutionary purpose. A man was jealous because he feared that his woman might carry a child that was not his. A woman was jealous because she feared that the man would not stay and provide for her throughout pregnancy. Thus men are more fearful of a single infidelity; and women are more fearful of losing loyalty and affection. If this is true then men are less likely to forgive a single occasion in which there was sexual intercourse. And women are less likely to forgive men who show affection for other women, whether or not it went as far as sexual intercou...

    published: 14 Feb 2012
  • English Poems for competitive exams - Go and catch a falling star by Poet John Donne

    UPSC or SSC or IBPS or RBI or Any Other Govt. Exam, We got them all covered. Beat the Competition with our Pendrive Courses/Online Coaching. Book Now - https://goo.gl/5mKTnz Free Video Courses - https://goo.gl/jtMKP9 Free PDFs - https://goo.gl/cJufZc Join TELEGRAM group of Study IQ - https://t.me/Studyiqeducation Follow US on Facebook - https://goo.gl/iAhPDJ Follow Dr Gaurav Garg on Facebook - https://goo.gl/xqLaQm The Hindu Editorial Analysis - https://goo.gl/vmvHjG Current Affairs by Dr Gaurav Garg - https://goo.gl/bqfkXe UPSC/IAS Burning Issues analysis- https://goo.gl/2NG7vP World History for UPSC - https://goo.gl/J7DLXv Indian History - https://goo.gl/kVwB79 UPSC/IAS past papers questions - https://goo.gl/F5gyWH SSC CGL + IBPS Quantitative tricks - https://goo.gl/C6d9n8 English V...

    published: 11 Oct 2017
  • √ John Donne's Poetry - Death be not proud | This is my playes last scene - If poisonous minerals

    https://www.iitutor.com John Donne (1573 -- 1631). John Donne was a British Renaissance poet famous for his poems on life, death and religion. His work is often dubbed as 'metaphysical' poetry due to his complex relationship with God and romantic themes. If poisonous minerals - This poem is Donne's argument about why death is not to be feared. Death is personified and belittled, ending with the paradox that 'death shall die'. This is tied in with Christian belief that death is met with eternal life, and so is not really a 'death' at all. The title reflects the crude personification of death; that it is proud of the fear often attached with it. Despite the title and a sense of connotation centred on death -- it is more a poem based on meditation. In this poem Donne's persona imagines hi...

    published: 11 Nov 2013
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Life Story of John Donne

Life Story of John Donne

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:16
  • Updated: 16 Sep 2015
  • views: 11950
videos
This is a video I made for my english glass where we were told to make a presentation to class about the poet John Donne. Hope you like it. This contains extracts from John Donne Biography Publisher A&E Television Networks http://www.biography.com/people/john-donne-9277090#profile
https://wn.com/Life_Story_Of_John_Donne
MASSOLIT: John Donne's Love Poetry

MASSOLIT: John Donne's Love Poetry

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:52
  • Updated: 29 Jan 2016
  • views: 1962
videos
In this lecture, Dr Anna Beer (University of Oxford) thinks about Donne’s poetry about love, focusing in particular on the poems The Sun Rising, The Good Morrow and The Canonization.
https://wn.com/Massolit_John_Donne's_Love_Poetry
Meta Physical Poets : John Donne

Meta Physical Poets : John Donne

  • Order:
  • Duration: 56:15
  • Updated: 10 Dec 2015
  • views: 16108
videos
This Lecture is on John Donne who is Known for his Metaphysical Poetry.Here meaning of Metaphysical poetry is explained As well as vivid discussion on john donne poetry is made. Objectives : 1. To understand the concept of Metaphysical poetry. 2. To learn about poet John Donne.
https://wn.com/Meta_Physical_Poets_John_Donne
Simon Schama's John Donne

Simon Schama's John Donne

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:10:01
  • Updated: 02 Dec 2016
  • views: 1078
videos
https://wn.com/Simon_Schama's_John_Donne
06 John Donne

06 John Donne

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:52
  • Updated: 21 Nov 2015
  • views: 3471
videos
A quick sketch of John Donne's life up until his writing of the Holy Sonnets, to give you a sense of the contradictions at the heart of his character.
https://wn.com/06_John_Donne
Richard Burton reads John Donne's poem  'Go and catch a falling star'

Richard Burton reads John Donne's poem 'Go and catch a falling star'

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:16
  • Updated: 16 Sep 2010
  • views: 44314
videos
https://wn.com/Richard_Burton_Reads_John_Donne's_Poem_'Go_And_Catch_A_Falling_Star'
The Flea by John Donne

The Flea by John Donne

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:57
  • Updated: 15 Jun 2015
  • views: 9752
videos https://wn.com/The_Flea_By_John_Donne
No Man is an Island by John Donne | Ep #58

No Man is an Island by John Donne | Ep #58

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:55
  • Updated: 02 Jul 2014
  • views: 21939
videos
Click to subscribe - - - - http://goo.gl/V0wpjW No Man Is An Island by John Donne (used as the epigraph in "For Whom the Bell Tolls" by Ernest Hemingway) No man is an island, Entire of itself, Every man is a piece of the continent, A part of the main. If a clod be washed away by the sea, Europe is the less. As well as if a promontory were. As well as if a manor of thy friend's Or of thine own were: Any man's death diminishes me, Because I am involved in mankind, And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; It tolls for thee.
https://wn.com/No_Man_Is_An_Island_By_John_Donne_|_Ep_58
The Flea By John Donne Analysis

The Flea By John Donne Analysis

  • Order:
  • Duration: 11:31
  • Updated: 05 Apr 2017
  • views: 5103
videos
Analysis of the metaphysical poet Donne's poem in relation to the theme of love
https://wn.com/The_Flea_By_John_Donne_Analysis
The Flea by John Donne - Poetry Reading

The Flea by John Donne - Poetry Reading

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:04
  • Updated: 04 Dec 2012
  • views: 30893
videos
The Flea - A poem by John Donne. About the poem - 'The Flea' is a complex yet almost hilarious conversation between two lovers, where the young man uses his exceptionally persuasive skills to coax his lady love to sleep with him. Throughout the poem Donne uses a skilled combination of tone, suggestive words and double meaning, to present an argument which is so clever that it might actually lead to the speaker having his way. About the poet - John Donne (19 June 1572 -- 31 March 1631) was an English poet, satirist, lawyer. He is considered as the representative of the metaphysical poets. His works are noted for their strong, sensual style and include sonnets, love poetry, religious poems, Latin translations, epigrams, elegies, songs, satires and sermons. His poetry is noted for its vibrancy of language and inventiveness of metaphor, especially compared to that of his contemporaries. For more videos log onto http://www.youtube.com/pearlsofwisdom Also find us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/pearlsofwisdomchannel Subscribe & Stay Tuned - http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=pearlsofwisdom
https://wn.com/The_Flea_By_John_Donne_Poetry_Reading
Wit - "Death, Be Not Proud"

Wit - "Death, Be Not Proud"

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:13
  • Updated: 28 Jun 2010
  • views: 79168
videos
Vivian, a graduate student, discusses the meaning and punctuation of John Dunne's "Holy Sonnet X" with her professor, Dr. Ashford. The sonnet is often known by its first line, "Death, Be Not Proud." Visit my channel for more films that quote poetry.
https://wn.com/Wit_Death,_Be_Not_Proud
The Good Morrow- John Donne

The Good Morrow- John Donne

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:02
  • Updated: 15 Dec 2013
  • views: 6249
videos
I wonder, by my troth, what thou and I Did, till we loved? Were we not weaned till then? But sucked on country pleasures, childishly? Or snorted we in the Seven Sleepers' den? 'Twas so; but this, all pleasures fancies be. If ever any beauty I did see, Which I desired, and got, 'twas but a dream of thee. And now good-morrow to our waking souls, Which watch not one another out of fear; For love, all love of other sights controls, And makes one little room an everywhere. Let sea-discoverers to new worlds have gone, Let maps to other, worlds on worlds have shown, Let us possess one world, each hath one, and is one. My face in thine eye, thine in mine appears, And true plain hearts do in the faces rest; Where can we find two better hemispheres, Without sharp north, without declining west? Whatever dies, was not mixed equally; If our two loves be one, or, thou and I Love so alike, that none do slacken, none can die. In "The Good Morrow", John Donne challenges the strength and beauty of love. Until Ella and Carl & Dean and Cindy met, they're lives were utterly different. When they united, whether it was in a retirement home or abandoned house, it was love at first sight and everything fell perfectly into place. Ella and Carl grew up as club buddies and best friends, who eventually wed, while Dean desperately tried to chase after the woman of his dreams. Finally fate is in Dean's favor and they run into each other on the bus. Both lovers' devote themselves to one another and their worlds become united-"each hath one, and is one." But, with happiness comes grave despair. Ella and Carl plan to start a family, but when they find out Ella is un-able to have children they are stricken with grief. Although they can never bear a son/daughter, their love grows on and happily. Unlike Ella, Cindy becomes pregnant and fears telling Dean. In time, they agreed to keep the child and finally wed. As time passes, one couple become closely "weaned", while Dean and Cindy fight to keep their marriage alive. Despite their efforts, Dean and Cindy's marriage begins to crumble right from underneath them. In the ending scene, Dean walks out of the house, down the street and out of their lives. On the other side of the story, Ella becomes sick and has to be hospitalized, until her unexpected death-leaving Carl, her only love, heart-broken. But nonetheless, Carl refuses to break his promise to his wife and carries their house to Paradise Falls, a dream of theirs since childhood. Works Cited: SpokenVerse. '"The Good Morrow' by John Donne(read by Tom O' Bedlam." Online video. Youtube. Youtube, 8 February. 2011. Web. 2 December. 2013 UP. Dir. Pete Docter. Bob Peterson. Writers. Pete Docter. Bob Peterson. Thomas McCarthy. Pixar Animation Studios. 2009. Film. Blue Valentine. Dir. Derek Cianfrance. Perf. Ryan Gosling. Michelle Williams. Distrib. The Weinstein Company. 2010. Film. Bear, Grizzly. "Shift." Blue Valentine. 2006.
https://wn.com/The_Good_Morrow_John_Donne
The Sun Rising by John Donne - Poetry Reading

The Sun Rising by John Donne - Poetry Reading

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:31
  • Updated: 21 Nov 2012
  • views: 16822
videos
The Sun Rising - A poem by John Donne. About the poem - The Sun Rising is one of Donne's popular and widely read and enjoyed love poems. It is a love poem of an unusual kind. In this poem, composed in the form of a dramatic monologue, the poet lover reprimands the Sun and calls it names for disturbing love making. About the poet - John Donne (19 June 1572 -- 31 March 1631) was an English poet, satirist, lawyer. He is considered as the representative of the metaphysical poets. His works are noted for their strong, sensual style and include sonnets, love poetry, religious poems, Latin translations, epigrams, elegies, songs, satires and sermons. His poetry is noted for its vibrancy of language and inventiveness of metaphor, especially compared to that of his contemporaries. For more videos log onto http://www.youtube.com/pearlsofwisdom Also find us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/pearlsofwisdomchannel Subscribe & Stay Tuned - http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=pearlsofwisdom
https://wn.com/The_Sun_Rising_By_John_Donne_Poetry_Reading
John Donne - The Good-Morrow - Poetry Lecture and Analysis by Dr. Andrew Barker

John Donne - The Good-Morrow - Poetry Lecture and Analysis by Dr. Andrew Barker

  • Order:
  • Duration: 40:15
  • Updated: 07 Jun 2014
  • views: 34780
videos
THE GOOD MORROW. A love poem from the morning after. Upon waking, the poet feels a new kind of love for the woman he is with. And this poem, "The Good Morrow", is what he tells her. But what was their relationship like? How has it changed? What will their love be like in the future? Dr. Andrew Barker's lecture on "The Good Morrow", looks at both the confidence and vulnerability of the one who speaks the beautiful lines that make up this declaration of heightened love. Note: Analysis of the line "Suckled on country pleasures childishly" contains profanity (34:40 -- 36:54). Andrew Barker Please LIKE and SUBSCRIBE. COMMENTS also are gratefully received. Click http://drandrewbarker.com should you wish for extra notes and a transcript of the lecture and analysis above.
https://wn.com/John_Donne_The_Good_Morrow_Poetry_Lecture_And_Analysis_By_Dr._Andrew_Barker
John Donne Biography

John Donne Biography

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:51
  • Updated: 24 Apr 2017
  • views: 487
videos
Recorded with http://screencast-o-matic.com
https://wn.com/John_Donne_Biography
What is JOHN DONNE GO AND CATCH A FALLING STAREE? BA English Literature (social sciences) Gurukpo

What is JOHN DONNE GO AND CATCH A FALLING STAREE? BA English Literature (social sciences) Gurukpo

  • Order:
  • Duration: 14:43
  • Updated: 02 Sep 2015
  • views: 30738
videos
Dr. Meenakshi Thakur, Assistant Professor, Biyani girls College explained about The poem of Donne in which he challenges that no woman on this earth will be honest and beautiful at the same time. www.gurukpo.com, www.biyanicolleges.org
https://wn.com/What_Is_John_Donne_Go_And_Catch_A_Falling_Staree_Ba_English_Literature_(Social_Sciences)_Gurukpo
A Brief Introduction Of John Donne by Munawar Ahmad Saeed

A Brief Introduction Of John Donne by Munawar Ahmad Saeed

  • Order:
  • Duration: 29:03
  • Updated: 20 Oct 2016
  • views: 7282
videos
A Brief Introduction Of John Donne by Munawar Ahmad Saeed http://englishhelplineforall.blogspot.com contactmunawar@gmail.com times college, times college samanabad, punjab university Lahore, punjab university course outline, punjab university MA english Notes, punjab university MA english lecture, ............................. punjab university ma english private admission 2017 last date, punjab university ma english part 1 date sheet 2017, punjab university ma english syllabus 2017, punjab university ma english part 1 result 2016, english literature notes, history of english literature, literary Terms english grammar and composition american literature history of english literature literature books Classic English Literature Reading List English Literature Dictionary audio lectures on english literature english literature courses online free english literature lecture youtube english literature courses online free english literature lecture youtube introduction of english literature www english litrature.com css, css literature, css preparation, css syllabus,
https://wn.com/A_Brief_Introduction_Of_John_Donne_By_Munawar_Ahmad_Saeed
Part 2 - The 3 Lives of John Donne; Why Metaphysical

Part 2 - The 3 Lives of John Donne; Why Metaphysical

  • Order:
  • Duration: 14:39
  • Updated: 20 Jan 2013
  • views: 19170
videos
This is the second part of my lecture on A Valediction Forbidding Mourning. I have made every effort to provide a deep insight into the poem while keeping the lecture as simple as possible. That is why no previous knowledge of poetry is necessary for a full understanding of it. I hope you find it useful. Part One - A Preview Part Two - The Three Lives of John Donne, The Mysterious Meaning of Metaphysical Part Three - An Introduction to the Poem, Stanza: 1 & 2 Part Four - Stanza: 3,4 & 5 Part Five - Stanza: 6,7,8,& 9; Comparative Considerations
https://wn.com/Part_2_The_3_Lives_Of_John_Donne_Why_Metaphysical
Poetry Analysis 22: “The Sun Rising” by John Donne

Poetry Analysis 22: “The Sun Rising” by John Donne

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:25
  • Updated: 28 Jan 2015
  • views: 9189
videos https://wn.com/Poetry_Analysis_22_“The_Sun_Rising”_By_John_Donne
Death, Be Not Proud by John Donne - Poetry Reading

Death, Be Not Proud by John Donne - Poetry Reading

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:30
  • Updated: 26 Sep 2012
  • views: 34986
videos
Death, Be Not Proud - A poem by John Donne. About the poem - "Death Be Not Proud" is a poem by English metaphysical poet John Donne, written around 1610 and first published posthumously in 1633. It is the tenth sonnet of Donne's posthumously published Holy Sonnets. The poem is addressed to Death, telling him not to be proud, because death is not to be feared. The poem explains because sleep is a type of death, and that it is pleasurable, then death must be even more so; that death is a slave to fate, chance (accidental death), kings (who have the power of life and death, such as the ability to levy war and command executions), and desperate men. The theme of the poem is generally describing about mortality. The sonnet has an ABBA ABBA CDDC EE rhyming scheme, emblematic of an enclosed rhyme. About the poet - John Donne (19 June 1572 -- 31 March 1631) was an English poet, satirist, lawyer. He is considered as the representative of the metaphysical poets. His works are noted for their strong, sensual style and include sonnets, love poetry, religious poems, Latin translations, epigrams, elegies, songs, satires and sermons. His poetry is noted for its vibrancy of language and inventiveness of metaphor, especially compared to that of his contemporaries. For more videos log onto http://www.youtube.com/pearlsofwisdom Also find us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/pearlsofwisdomchannel Subscribe & Stay Tuned - http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=pearlsofwisdom
https://wn.com/Death,_Be_Not_Proud_By_John_Donne_Poetry_Reading
John Donne The Sun Rising

John Donne The Sun Rising

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:22
  • Updated: 09 Feb 2013
  • views: 7195
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The Sun Rising by John Donne John Donne (pron.: /ˈdʌn/ DUN) (between 24 January and 19 June 1572[1] -- 31 March 1631) was an English poet, satirist, lawyer and a cleric in the Church of England. He is considered the pre-eminent representative of the metaphysical poets. His works are noted for their strong, sensual style and include sonnets, love poetry, religious poems, Latin translations, epigrams, elegies, songs, satires and sermons. His poetry is noted for its vibrancy of language and inventiveness of metaphor, especially compared to that of his contemporaries. Donne's style is characterised by abrupt openings and various paradoxes, ironies and dislocations. These features, along with his frequent dramatic or everyday speech rhythms, his tense syntax and his tough eloquence, were both a reaction against the smoothness of conventional Elizabethan poetry and an adaptation into English of European baroque and mannerist techniques. His early career was marked by poetry that bore immense knowledge of British society and he met that knowledge with sharp criticism. Another important theme in Donne's poetry is the idea of true religion, something that he spent much time considering and theorising about. He wrote secular poems as well as erotic and love poems. He is particularly famous for his mastery of metaphysical conceits.[3] Despite his great education and poetic talents, Donne lived in poverty for several years, relying heavily on wealthy friends. He spent much of the money he inherited during and after his education on womanising, literature, pastimes, and travel. In 1601, Donne secretly married Anne More, with whom he had twelve children.[4] In 1615, he became an Anglican priest, although he did not want to take Anglican orders. He did so because King James I persistently ordered it. In 1621, he was appointed the Dean of St Paul's Cathedral in London. He also served as a member of parliament in 1601 and in 1614. seehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Donne see poem http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/the-sun-rising/ John Donne,The Sun Rising,The Sunne Rising,English Literature,poetry,poets,great English Poets,Poem,
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The Indifferent by John Donne (read by Tom O'Bedlam)

The Indifferent by John Donne (read by Tom O'Bedlam)

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  • Duration: 2:15
  • Updated: 14 Feb 2012
  • views: 5602
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This is a poem about jealousy and fidelity. Let me offer a theory: that jealousy is differently motivated in men and women: that male jealousy is inherently different from female jealousy. Jealousy is in our DNA because serves an evolutionary purpose. A man was jealous because he feared that his woman might carry a child that was not his. A woman was jealous because she feared that the man would not stay and provide for her throughout pregnancy. Thus men are more fearful of a single infidelity; and women are more fearful of losing loyalty and affection. If this is true then men are less likely to forgive a single occasion in which there was sexual intercourse. And women are less likely to forgive men who show affection for other women, whether or not it went as far as sexual intercourse. Of course, this is not an inviolable rule or maybe not even true- I'm just thinking it over. One argument against it would be that prehistoric man did not connect the sex act with pregnancy. It's unlikely that animals make this connection, they are just following their instincts. But jealousy in both sexes would still work as an evolutionary mechanism: awareness isn't a necessity. The reason is that is the genes look after their own interests, not the interests of the individuals who bear them. Now I'm confused.... Jealousy in its extreme form is a most counter-productive emotion. Any person who is overtly jealous is, in effect, offering the other party a method of ending the relationship. Infidelity is the red button which, if pushed, burns the bridges. Jealousy only keeps the other party faithful while the relationship is going smoothly. As soon as there is a serious dispute in which the idea of a future together is abandoned - even temporarily - then all promises are worthless. The jealous partner's feelings become vulnerabilities. The way to end things once and for all, and to rid oneself forever of the overbearing jealous partner, is to be unfaithful. After that there's no going back. Relationships do depend on mutual agreements. All love-contracts are different but most couples in long-term relationships have a pact of exclusivity. They might say, "if you are ever unfaithful to me I shall leave you, and that will be the end." They might add, "I just couldn't bear the thought of you being with someone else". The other party might say, "Don't worry, I would never hurt you in that way. Nor would I want to spoil my experience of loving you". Most people are jealous to some extent, but it doesn't matter if jealousy and suspicion don't interfere with everyday life, The most extreme form of jealousy has an element of paranoia. I dislike words from psychology to describe human emotions, but paranoia does describe the concept very well. Paranoid jealousy does not need evidence. The jealous husband returning home at the end of the day might say, "The position that chair means my wife has been unfaithful to me". This sort of jealousy is far closer to hatred than to love. People with paranoid jealousy do not understand their beloved very well and they can be dangerous. "Jealousy is never satisfied with anything short of an omniscience that would detect the subtlest fold of the heart.". George Eliot Extreme jealousy is possibly the most distressing emotion and it is very hard to cure it. Maybe it stems from feelings of unworthiness instilled in childhood. If so then a loving and considerate partner can, over a long period of time, reassure and repair a jealous one. The jealous person might very well be a good, worthwhile person with just that one flaw in their nature. Only the power of your own love can help you decide whether it is worth persevering. There's some interesting information about John Donne here: http://www.openlettersmonthly.com/changeable-camelion/ The Mirror of the Devil painted by Antoine Wiertz (1806-1865), Jealousy was painted by Tom Roberts I can love both fair and brown, Her whom abundance melts, and her whom want betrays, Her who loves loneness best, and her who masks and plays, Her whom the country formed, and whom the town, Her who believes, and her who tries, Her who still weeps with spongy eyes, And her who is dry cork, and never cries; I can love her, and her, and you, and you, I can love any, so she be not true. Will no other vice content you? Will it not serve your turn to do as did your mothers? Or have you old vices spent, and now would find out others? Or doth a fear, that men are true, torment you? Oh we are not, be not you so; Let me, and do you, twenty know. Rob me, but bind me not, and let me go. Must I, who came to travel thorough you, Grow your fixed subject, because you are true?
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English Poems for competitive exams - Go and catch a falling star by Poet John Donne

English Poems for competitive exams - Go and catch a falling star by Poet John Donne

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  • Duration: 15:09
  • Updated: 11 Oct 2017
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√ John Donne's Poetry - Death be not proud | This is my playes last scene - If poisonous minerals

√ John Donne's Poetry - Death be not proud | This is my playes last scene - If poisonous minerals

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  • Duration: 32:23
  • Updated: 11 Nov 2013
  • views: 14095
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https://www.iitutor.com John Donne (1573 -- 1631). John Donne was a British Renaissance poet famous for his poems on life, death and religion. His work is often dubbed as 'metaphysical' poetry due to his complex relationship with God and romantic themes. If poisonous minerals - This poem is Donne's argument about why death is not to be feared. Death is personified and belittled, ending with the paradox that 'death shall die'. This is tied in with Christian belief that death is met with eternal life, and so is not really a 'death' at all. The title reflects the crude personification of death; that it is proud of the fear often attached with it. Despite the title and a sense of connotation centred on death -- it is more a poem based on meditation. In this poem Donne's persona imagines his deathbed and chronicles his ascension from Earth to Heaven. Donne uses analogies and metaphors such as that of the title, and 'last run race'. This is my playes last scene - There is also conflict between his soul which ascends, his body which remains on earth and his sins which fall toward hell. This poem is essentially about the second coming of Jesus, where the dead will rise and be judged. Donne's persona, too, talks about his own judgement. Lists manners of death and suggests that Christ's second coming will see their bodies reanimated. death be not proud - Donne's persona speaks of his own judgement somewhat paradoxically -- begging to learn repentance with blood even though the sacrifice of Jesus (and his blood) means he is already forgiven. This poem is a soliloquy or a prayer of Donne's. At the round earths imagin'd corners, blow - The first part, he laments that God forgives animals and things that 'poison' but doesn't forgive a human for much lesser crimes. A Valediction: forbidding mourning - His tone then shifts to one begging mercy. One of his last poems, reputably written shortly before his death. Hymne to God my God in my sicknesse - Makes a number of cartographical analogies, particularly his body being a 'map', along with it being a device that leads one into the afterlife. He asks not for healing, he is prepared to die and asks mainly for a peaceful death. The Apparation - Makes a number of references to biblical ideas such as to Adam and the crucifixion, trying to link the idea of death and life being the same -- coupled with the reference of going West. The Relique - This poem is about Donne leaving for a voyage, and is addressed to his wife. It makes 'conceits' or analogies about how their love with conquer their separation; to gold, to death, to 'the spheres' and to a compass. The compass metaphor is expanded to say that the compass is two parts operating as one. She is at the centre while he is following her, eventually coming full circle upon his return home. This poem is a revenge fantasy. It is about a man by scorning his lover, who in return promises to haunt her and her new love. The poem tries to position the woman as impure -- not a virgin and promiscuous. He threatens her with a ghostly promise that he won't reveal until the night she is in bed with her new lover. He is trying to force her hand to stay with him, and indicates other lovers are worse than he is, and she should repent. This is a complex earlier work from Donne about a persona fantasising about his exhumation. Here we find him and a lover's body dug up -- suggesting with more than 'one a bed' about her carrying a child. The Sunne Rising - He also fantasises about their bones becoming relics like those of Mary Magdalene. Compared to The Apparation, these lovers are 'purer'. The woman is a virgin and their love is true. Those who kiss on greeting and farewell, but 'not between meals'. The Sunne Rising is about Donne's persona and lover being woken by the sun. He feels aggrieved that the sun has come and ruined the romantic evening the lover and he shared, and that they must 'part'. He takes a tone mocking the sun, and claims that the lover and he share something more important than sunlight. That he could block out the sun by closing his eyes. However, this is a suggestion that would stop him being able to look at her, and likens their bedroom to the centre of the universe. ETDJP1 http://youtu.be/DgHf6TrX2s8
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